Can Home Improvements Increase the Value of Your House?

One of the most common reasons people give when asked why they are improving their home is that home improvements increase house value. While this can often be true, it is by no means as universal as some people assume it is. When you’re about to pay out lots of money for a home improvement, it’s worth checking whether the value of your house will increase by enough to pay for it – or, worse, whether it might actually force your house value down.

Let’s start with bathrooms and kitchens. While well-maintained and nice-looking kitchens and bathrooms do add value to a home, there’s nothing to say that they have to be the very latest thing. An older room that is well looked-after and wasn’t a complete abomination to begin with can often help the value just as much as a newly-installed one.

Extensions, on the other hand, almost always increase the value of your home, as they make it bigger. A four-bedroom home can be significantly more valuable on the market than a three-bedroom one, as a bigger family can live in it. However, you need to watch out for building too far out into your garden if you only have a small one: get rid of too much of your garden, and you could knock even more value off your home than you gain from the extra bedroom.

Although it might seem strange, this same rule also applies to garden features such as swimming pools and ponds. While you might like them, not everyone does – and you’ve just taken a piece of garden that could be used for almost anything and turned it into a single-use feature. Also, swimming pools especially can be very expensive to maintain, which can put off potential house buyers.

Overall, it’s a bad idea to make home improvements just to make money, as you will almost always fail. Instead, just make the improvements that you want, while avoiding any that will really hit your house’s price.

Home Improvement Design Elements

Before you tackle any home improvement project, you need to look at the design elements involved in order to determine which route to take with your project. Going the wrong way with your main steps could mean major backtracking and / or much more work.

For example, let’s say you need to remodel or redecorate en entire room. Would you need to start with the ceiling first or the wall? One could add more work to the project than tackling the entire process form the other way around. So let’s take a look at basic design elements for some of the major home improvement projects people undertake.

Wall and Floors

A general rule of thumb is: tackle the messiest, hardest work first, work that would be the most difficult to re-do, before moving along to the next stage of your interior design. In other words take walls, for instance. Regardless of whether you decide to repaint, add or change wall paper or even remodel the walls first, then do the rest, the entire process is a lot of labor intensive, messy work. So this is most generally where to begin with interior design.

Now yes, if these walls are attached to a floor that needs expanded first, that’s another story. You need to coordinate both large parts of your project, figuring blueprints our well on paper first and planning ahead.

Along with your wall and flooring work designs, you need to plan for gathering your materials together to be ready and work at a good pace. List any work gloves, wallpaper, adhesive, paints, wax, brushes, sponges, carpeting, rugs and other treatments for walls and flooring work that you will need, so that you can easily grab everything and go.

Lighting, Windows and Furniture

You need to work plenty of lighting, both from electricity and from natural means, including from windows and other glass (like slider doors) into your design elements. Plus include your furniture and other accessories (stereo, gaming equipment, etc.) Begin with the central or focus point – like a television or gaming system, then work outwards, coordinating everything.